The Book and Beyond

No. 1 - Year 2 - 12/2011

University of Zadar | eISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

About a year and a half ago, or perhaps it was more, no one seems to remember the exact day anymore, when we decided to start [sic] – a Journal of Literature, Culture and Literary Translation, in our minds we had a small journal that would nevertheless stimulate debates and challenge authors to participate with their contributions in hope of offering a somewhat different view on various topics and themes that we think about in our professional life and work. We hoped for some hundred or perhaps two hundred pages of articles, essays and translations; we counted on contributions from our friends and colleagues from Croatia and secretly dreamed that someone from abroad will find our journal interesting enough to join in. And today, when we are releasing our third issue that counts well over five hundred pages of articles, essays and translations, with more than twenty authors from all over the world, we are safe to say that we more than exceeded our initial expectations and even our wildest hopes. ...

Literary Translation
Richard Berengarten and Daša Marić:

IVXIXIVXVIIIXXXXIXXVXXXIXXXII

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.7
Literary Translation
Richard Berengarten:

The Croatian poet Augustin (Tin) Ujević (1891–1955) is one of the finest Southern Slav lyric poets and one of the great poets of Europe in the first half of the 20th century. What follows is a sketch of some of the qualities of his lyrical poems, from the particular perspective of an English poet who has translated some of them. My intention is to introduce a poet who, so far, has scarcely been registered at all in the English-speaking world, by prefacing translations of twelve poems. The idea here is to pick out strands and suggest possible entry points. I also want to explore some of the reasons why I think he merits the appellation ‘great poet’, one that is easy enough to bestow, perhaps too easy, but less so to justify. The procedure I shall adopt in the notes that follow will be suggestive and glancing rather than direct and expository. While the notes will of course move into and around some of Tin’s lyrical poems and suggest paths for critical analysis and interpretative discuss...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.4
Literary Translation
Chuck Palahniuk and Valentina Lisak:

Iza zaključanih vrata zahoda u stražnjem dijelu antikvarnice Claire Upton razgovara na telefon. Glas joj odjekuje od poda i zidova: Koliko je teško provaliti nadzornu kameru? Ukrasti snimku? upita svog muža i počne plakati.U zadnjih tjedan dana bila je u tom dućanu već tri ili četiri puta. Jedan od onih gdje moraš ostaviti torbu na blagajni, inače te ne puste unutra. Moraš ostaviti i kaput, ako ima duboke, prostrane džepove. I kišobran, jer bi ljudi u nabore mogli ubacivati sitne predmete, češljeve, nakit i druge drangulije. Kraj starog blagajnika stoji sivi karton na kojem crnim markerom piše: “Ne volimo kad nas kradete!”Skidajući kaput, Claire reče: “Ja nisam lopov.”Stari blagajnik pogledom ju je odmjerio od glave do pete. Coknuo je jezikom i pitao: “Po čemu ste vi iznimka?”Za svaki ostavljeni predmet dao je Claire polovicu karte. Za torbicu hercova asa. Za kaput trefovu devetku. Za kišobran pikovu trojku.Pogledom je prešao preko Claireinih ruku, obrisa džepova na prsima i najlonki t...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.12
Literary Translation
Joyce Ellen Turner:

In fine-tuning Turusbek Madilbay’s rough dictionary translation (a ‘trot’) I became convinced that a good match between writers and editors or translators is essential. I imagine it’s tempting for a writer to throw up her hands, to abdicate responsibility and let the publishing houses use their stock translators, but I recommend that creative writers learn about the process of translation in order to find the best partner for putting their work into another language. The responsibility must never rest solely with the translator, who is always working with limited information and within temporal and fiscal constraints. It’s always, to some degree, piecework. I hope it’s not a breach of publishing protocol to read reviews of work by, and to solicit samples from, several literary translators, and then choose among them. A beginner will do the job more cheaply, but will the skill be there? Do not leave the job to chance. My spotty linguistic background was well-suited to working with a tro...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.6
Literary Translation
Russell Scott Valentino:

You want your author to be appreciated, to be read. Yes, why not, to be respected. As a writer at least, if not as a person. And the author’s image, not just the work, is in your hands. That’s the way it works in English at least, where translation tends to be decentralized. I’m not referring to commissions obviously. In that sense translation is like any kind of creative writing – you choose your project, you shape it, you develop it, you pitch and promote it, and you pitch and promote the image of the author that goes with it. So the question: what to do when your author is not an especially attractive character, not a good person, a bad husband, for instance, a bad father?For instance, Eligio Zanini was a bad husband and a bad father. He abandoned his family when two children were small and a third was on the way. He never contacted them again, though he lived just down the road. When his son died in a car accident at the age of seventeen and the parents were supposed to go down to ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.1
Literature and Culture
Sandra Singer, University of Guelph, Canada:

The present issue of [sic] investigates cultural forms that work against monumentalization of literature as conceived by the notion of the static literary canon. [sic]’s ostensibly Lukácsian approach grasps literature (along the Marxist vein) as a catalyst or as a call to action. The subject of the following discussion, Returning to Haifa written in 1969 by Ghassan Kanafani, offers up the author’s voice representing his politicized position within Palestinian culture and history. Within a newly evolving nationalist Palestinian literature – independent from other Arabic national or canonical Islamic texts – Kanafani’s writing has provided a framework and impetus for questioning accepted hierarchical notions of Palestinian governance; that is, the unequal relationship between the Palestinians in exile, in the territories and in Israel. Thereby his novella problematizes both generally accepted Palestinian and Israeli-Western morality that serves to buttress intransigent though commonly he...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.4