The Book and Beyond

No. 1 - Year 2 - 12/2011

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

About a year and a half ago, or perhaps it was more, no one seems to remember the exact day anymore, when we decided to start [sic] – a Journal of Literature, Culture and Literary Translation, in our minds we had a small journal that would nevertheless stimulate debates and challenge authors to participate with their contributions in hope of offering a somewhat different view on various topics and themes that we think about in our professional life and work. We hoped for some hundred or perhaps two hundred pages of articles, essays and translations; we counted on contributions from our friends and colleagues from Croatia and secretly dreamed that someone from abroad will find our journal interesting enough to join in. And today, when we are releasing our third issue that counts well over five hundred pages of articles, essays and translations, with more than twenty authors from all over the world, we are safe to say that we more than exceeded our initial expectations and even our wildest hopes. ...

Literature and Culture
Lissi Athanasiou Krikelis, City University of New York, USA:

Due to their self-reflexive propensity, postmodern fiction and metafiction, in particular, have been relentlessly criticized of solipsism and of an indifference to relate to the extralinguistic world. While the novel is deemed to pause in its trajectory to examine itself, to examine its conventions and rejections of them, to address its future uncertainties and its at-present struggles, it has become a misprision that all it can bestow to its readers is an understanding of itself. The basic argument unravels as follows: language is devoid of reality, therefore, literature does not contain reality either; now more than ever, fiction recognizes that it is a self-contained artifact which can only engage in a representation of itself, having no interest in proffering its readers anything but an understanding of itself. The novel in the postmodern period has faced the crisis of representation, when linguists and theorists alike unmask the insufficiency of language and its inability to repre...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.3
Literary Translation
Sanja Cimer:

Straußeneimondaber ich finde nichts mehrnichts mehr an Buchstaben im Wortmache so ähnlichwie Luftgang ohne Seiles fällt nichts mehraber nichts ist eben auchZaungrenzeund LebenMittelstelzengangder Strauß legt seine Eier in den Himmelfast Massenproduktionkugelrunde Stundenmit Haut auf wirren ÜberzugHände greifen leerwenn nicht duaber das kann nicht –Angsttauchen mit Höhengangund die Hand als Schalewer fängt, – verliert!Mjesec od nojevog jajetaali nema ničeg višeničeg više u slovima riječičinim sličnokao hod po zraku bez konopcaništa više ne padaali i ništa jestgranica od ogradei životsredinom na štulamanoj liježe svoja jaja u nebogotovo masovna proizvodnjasati okrugli poput loptes kožom na neurednoj presvlaciruke posežu u praznoako nisi tiali to ne može –uron u strah s letom u visinei ruka poput ljusketko ulovi, – izgubi!Prevođenje poezije oduvijek se smatralo osobitom temom unutar ionako složenog područja književnog prevođenja. Budući da poezija predstavlja književni oblik u kojem su sa...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.8
Literature and Culture
Nadezhda Georgieva-Stankova, Trakia University, Bulgaria:

John Stuart Mill’s, The Subjection of Women (1869), remains one of the harbingers of women’s emancipation and presents a strong moral argument in support of the suffrage movement in late 19th century Victorian England. His work launches an urgent appeal for the need to provide freedom, equal treatment and opportunities to women, so that they can develop their capacities for the full benefit of a liberal democratic society. An imaginary dialogue is established between Mill’s significant statement of liberal feminism and his audiences at the time of publishing of the book as well as the new generations, with the purpose of tracing the significance of his book in challenging social structure and discussing crucial problems of social justice, such as gender equality and freedom. Reading the book requires a contextualist approach regarding the historical context as well as dominant political and ideological discourses. Such an approach may also explain many of the perceived ‘shortcomings’ o...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.9
Literature and Culture
Carroll Clayton Savant, University of Texas, USA:

“America is now wholly given over to a d – d mob of scribbling women, and I should have no chance of success while the public taste is occupied by their trash…” (Hawthorne 304). However Nathaniel Hawthorne chose to voice his frustration with the American female writer, she did play a significant social role in nineteenth-century American cultural history. Formally removed from the political discourse of their generation, women activists turned to other means for disseminating opinions and disapproval. The rising genre of the novel was one of the most effective and visible forms available to American women. Viewed as an historical artifact, the novel was steeped in social convention and cultural ideology. Therefore, when women turned to it to voice opposition to Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act, they did so by embracing the traditionally-accepted methodology of the novel, but altering it through subversive language and plots to suit their critical needs. The goal of this paper is to ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.2
Literary Translation
Tatjana Tolstoj and Petar Karavlah:

Kako se približavalo doba Škorpiona, postajalo je sve vjetrovitije, tamno i kišovito. Mokri, tekući grad, koji je vjetrom udarao u stakla iza nezaštićenih samačkih prozora bez zavjesa, iza sirnog namaza skrivenog u hladnoći između prozorskih stakala, nalikovao je na podlu Petrovu nakanu, na grad gorostasnog, buljavog cara tesara razjapljene gubice i oštrog jezika, koji u noćnim morama, s mornarskom sjekirom u podignutoj šaci, sustiže svoje onemoćale, prestrašene podanike. Rijeke su se, dotekavši do nabujalog, zastrašujućeg mora, bacale natrag te šišteći probijale okanca od lijevanog željeza i brzinski podizale razinu vode u podrumima muzeja, oblizujući krhke kolekcije koje su se raspršivale u vlažni pijesak, šamanske maske od pijetlova perja, zakrivljene inozemne mačeve, ogrtače opšivene biserima, žilave noge srditih zaposlenika probuđenih usred noći. Na takve dane, kada se iz kiše, mraka i vjetra koji je savijao stakla ocrtavao bijeli sirasti lik samoće, Simeonov je na rubu postojanja...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.9
Literature and Culture
Tea Bartulović and Sanja Runtić:

In the past four decades the U.S. cultural scene has witnessed a groundbreaking emergence of a number of Native American writers who have transformed the perception of minority literature, challenging Western audience to reconsider popular stereotypes and received assumptions of indigenous history, identity and culture. Today many of those writers hold prominent positions on popular bestseller and university reading lists, and interest in reading and studying their work is a mainstream trend. Committed to cultural and historical revisionism, they have also expanded the notion of a literary text, and the book as its traditional medium, turning it into a political weapon, a zone of conceptual contact, contestation and dialogue. With his third novel Fools Crow (1986) renowned Blackfeet author James Welch pointed his bow and pen in that direction as well.Set in the 1870s, the period of Indian wars, Fools Crow is a story about the tragedy of Native Americans caused by the coming of the Euro...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.7