The Book and Beyond

No. 1 - Year 2 - 12/2011

University of Zadar | eISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

About a year and a half ago, or perhaps it was more, no one seems to remember the exact day anymore, when we decided to start [sic] – a Journal of Literature, Culture and Literary Translation, in our minds we had a small journal that would nevertheless stimulate debates and challenge authors to participate with their contributions in hope of offering a somewhat different view on various topics and themes that we think about in our professional life and work. We hoped for some hundred or perhaps two hundred pages of articles, essays and translations; we counted on contributions from our friends and colleagues from Croatia and secretly dreamed that someone from abroad will find our journal interesting enough to join in. And today, when we are releasing our third issue that counts well over five hundred pages of articles, essays and translations, with more than twenty authors from all over the world, we are safe to say that we more than exceeded our initial expectations and even our wildest hopes. ...

Literary Translation
Tatjana Tolstoj and Petar Karavlah:

Kako se približavalo doba Škorpiona, postajalo je sve vjetrovitije, tamno i kišovito. Mokri, tekući grad, koji je vjetrom udarao u stakla iza nezaštićenih samačkih prozora bez zavjesa, iza sirnog namaza skrivenog u hladnoći između prozorskih stakala, nalikovao je na podlu Petrovu nakanu, na grad gorostasnog, buljavog cara tesara razjapljene gubice i oštrog jezika, koji u noćnim morama, s mornarskom sjekirom u podignutoj šaci, sustiže svoje onemoćale, prestrašene podanike. Rijeke su se, dotekavši do nabujalog, zastrašujućeg mora, bacale natrag te šišteći probijale okanca od lijevanog željeza i brzinski podizale razinu vode u podrumima muzeja, oblizujući krhke kolekcije koje su se raspršivale u vlažni pijesak, šamanske maske od pijetlova perja, zakrivljene inozemne mačeve, ogrtače opšivene biserima, žilave noge srditih zaposlenika probuđenih usred noći. Na takve dane, kada se iz kiše, mraka i vjetra koji je savijao stakla ocrtavao bijeli sirasti lik samoće, Simeonov je na rubu postojanja...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.9
Literature and Culture
Stacey Berry, Dakota State University, USA:

The idea expressed in the quotation above, by a hostage-poet in 1960s Beirut that appears in Don DeLillo’s novel MAO II, suggests the importance of writing as a way to produce new space. The narrative examines the difficult and necessary relationship between the writer, the written word, and the production of social change. In focusing attention specifically on the power of text to influence systems of oppression on a large cultural scale, MAO II provides examples of the ways in which texts record and respond to unique oppressive situations. In this way, the text functions more complexly within the space of the larger social dialectic than simply as a record of social failings. By presenting the violence of oppressive space back to the society that created it, the novel becomes an object of social protest. An examination of two other novels of social protest, John Edgar Wideman’s Philadelphia Fire and Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer, further illustrates the way that the book is used as ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.6
Literary Translation
Sanja Cimer:

Straußeneimondaber ich finde nichts mehrnichts mehr an Buchstaben im Wortmache so ähnlichwie Luftgang ohne Seiles fällt nichts mehraber nichts ist eben auchZaungrenzeund LebenMittelstelzengangder Strauß legt seine Eier in den Himmelfast Massenproduktionkugelrunde Stundenmit Haut auf wirren ÜberzugHände greifen leerwenn nicht duaber das kann nicht –Angsttauchen mit Höhengangund die Hand als Schalewer fängt, – verliert!Mjesec od nojevog jajetaali nema ničeg višeničeg više u slovima riječičinim sličnokao hod po zraku bez konopcaništa više ne padaali i ništa jestgranica od ogradei životsredinom na štulamanoj liježe svoja jaja u nebogotovo masovna proizvodnjasati okrugli poput loptes kožom na neurednoj presvlaciruke posežu u praznoako nisi tiali to ne može –uron u strah s letom u visinei ruka poput ljusketko ulovi, – izgubi!Prevođenje poezije oduvijek se smatralo osobitom temom unutar ionako složenog područja književnog prevođenja. Budući da poezija predstavlja književni oblik u kojem su sa...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.8
Literature and Culture
Tea Bartulović and Sanja Runtić:

In the past four decades the U.S. cultural scene has witnessed a groundbreaking emergence of a number of Native American writers who have transformed the perception of minority literature, challenging Western audience to reconsider popular stereotypes and received assumptions of indigenous history, identity and culture. Today many of those writers hold prominent positions on popular bestseller and university reading lists, and interest in reading and studying their work is a mainstream trend. Committed to cultural and historical revisionism, they have also expanded the notion of a literary text, and the book as its traditional medium, turning it into a political weapon, a zone of conceptual contact, contestation and dialogue. With his third novel Fools Crow (1986) renowned Blackfeet author James Welch pointed his bow and pen in that direction as well.Set in the 1870s, the period of Indian wars, Fools Crow is a story about the tragedy of Native Americans caused by the coming of the Euro...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.7
Literature and Culture
Andrea Pisac, Goldsmiths College, United Kingdom:

This article examines authorship as a socially embedded process by challenging Western notions of the autonomous creative genius. It considers social interactions between various agents in the field of literary production which in turn recovers the collective nature of modern authorship. Far from leaving it unexamined, it further contextualises authorial collectivity and its role in the emerging model of authorship. Questions and arguments raised in this article are informed by the ethnographic data collected during my doctoral research focusing on the reception of post-1990s ex-Yugoslav literature on the UK book market. Such ethnographic approach to literary translations – i.e. the micro-level analysis of social interactions that ‘create’ literature – demonstrated how the author is ‘created’ in the communication of two literary systems through linguistic translation as well as re-translations of symbolic and social capitals. My research was concerned with analysing the ‘backstage’ of ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lc.1
Literary Translation
Anna Rosen Guercio:

World literature’s natural home is comparative literature, a discipline born from and shaped by, as Vilashini Cooppan elegantly puts it, “scholarly engagements with the categories of migration, exile, diaspora, and globalization” (15). However, world literature has frequently been framed as a problem for the discipline, in large part because of its dependence on the ever-vexing and still mistrusted specter of translation. In light of the long-standing anxiety toward both world literature and translation, I propose here that comparatists do ourselves a terrible disservice if we do not urgently take up the questions raised by this disciplinary tension. Translation – in all of its attendant struggles with ethics, aesthetics, appropriation, authority – is not the problem, but, rather, should be understood as a key critical lens for comparative and world literature.In order to establish academia’s frustration with this subject, one need look no further than the “Three Reports to the America...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.2.lt.5