Lively Histories

No. 1 - Year 12 - 12/2021

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

This issue of [sic] marks the end of yet another turbulent year. Looking back at 2021, we take close inspection of not only the past turbulent year but also of the various instances of past times. Times immersed within diverse cultural artifacts, from movies and old collections of stories, to various novels and new ways of living that bring us to something long forgotten....

Literature and Culture
Lidija Štrmelj, University of Zadar, Croatia:

This article aims to identify conceptual metaphors in the Middle English text of The Miller’s Prologue and The Miller’s Tale and to find their equivalents in the Croatian translation done by Luko Paljetak, in order to deduce which metaphors are conventional in both languages and cultures. The investigation of conventionality will be based on the comparison of source concepts in English and Croatian linguistic expressions used in conceiving of metaphorical targets. Metaphors in both languages will be classified according to their cognitive function into structural, ontological, and orientational, which will appoint to the type(s) of metaphors with the greatest and smallest amount of overlapping. Finally, the analysis will lead to the conclusion whether the differences in metaphor usage in two languages are the consequence of cognitive differences between their speakers or the consequence of socio-cultural development that took place in the period of about 600 years which have passed bet...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.4
Literature and Culture
Marijana Jeleč and Iris Spajić:

Contemporary Austrian novels with a family theme go beyond the problematization of two-generational conflicts and tell the story of at least three generations of the family. These are generational novels that often deal with the phenomenon of crisis and the collapse of the family as a result of the crisis. The paper shows that historical caesuras run through the generational novel, showing the causes and consequences of major socio-political changes on the family, which is the basis for all family conflicts in the novel Es geht uns gut (We’re Doing Fine) by Austrian writer Arno Geiger. The approach to the topic begins with a conceptual definition of the crisis and the family, and a reflection on their interconnectedness. When it comes to crisis, the starting point is that it requires a reaction within the community, and that the lack of an appropriate response leads to disintegration; in this particular case it concerns the family but can be reflected in the wider society. The aim of t...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.6
Literature and Culture
Sanghamitra Dalal, MARA University of Technology, Malaysia:

In this paper, I will refer to the Malaysian Migrant Worker and Refugee Poetry Competition and the subsequent collection of the selected entries entitled Voices of the Displaced. I will contend that this opportunity of showcasing the literary and cultural agency of traditionally peripheral migration in Malaysia is effectively instrumental in generating an alternative perspective in addressing the existing discourse of migration and diaspora. Therefore, I will propose that the notion of “local modernities,” as professed by Bill Ashcroft, is an appropriate articulation in order to locate this contemporary cultural contingency. Consequently, I will attempt to argue that the emerging diasporic interspaces of local modernities in Malaysia are capable of not only creating shifting spaces and practices where participatory negotiation of sameness and difference can be sustained, but also of initiating a polylogue that represents the distinctive divergences.Keywords: migration, diaspora, local ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.7
Literature and Culture
Nikica Gilić, University of Zagreb, Croatia:

The characters of Živojin Pavlović’s seminal film The Rats Woke Up (Buđenje Pacova, 1967), regularly discussed in the context of the Yugoslav Black Wave cinema, offer significant and very intriguing figures of dissent. The film depicts misfits, bottom-dwellers, and dissidents living on the margins of society in the largest and capital city of Belgrade at a time when Black Wave authors have been breaking some new grounds for Yugoslav cinema and influencing artists well after the movement became a part of history. This essay concentrates on the characters and their interaction, the complexity of which suggests the complexity of Pavlović’s criticism of everyday life and institutions in the 1960s Yugoslavia.Keywords: Živojin Pavlović, The Rats Woke Up, Black Wave, Belgrade, figures of dissent, film criticism, Yugoslav cinemaHistorical studies of socialist Yugoslav cinema often place special emphasis on the Black Wave tendency of the 1960s and early 1970s (Goulding), sometimes even consider...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.2
Literature and Culture
Vincenzo Maria Di Mino, independent researcher, Italy:

In recent decades, the concept of “complexity” has been one of the leitmotifs of social science used to open the conceptual baggage needed to understand the dynamics of “post-modernity,” primarily the composition and structure of society, and the mutations of the technologies of government. Alex Williams, a British political scientist, is best known for the important work Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work, co-written with Nick Srnicek, which posed the politically dense and central problem of the collective use of technologies to “accelerate” the overcoming of capitalism. His latest book, Political Hegemony and Social Complexity: Mechanism of Power After Gramsci, elaborates on some of the diagnoses set out in the previous one, especially those concerning neoliberalism as not merely an economic but a total social phenomenon, and those on the ambivalent, porous, and productive intertwining of politics and technology. The focus on hegemony allows Williams to con...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.10
Literature and Culture
Rafaela Božić and Antonia Pintarić:

The aim of this paper is to research the translation procedures of metaphors for LOVE in the novel Chevengur by Andrei Platonov by using a corpus linguistics search tool to explore the potential of corpus analysis in literary translation. The research shows that the analyzed translation is dominated by the M M procedure, that is, translation with the same conceptual metaphor and, more precisely, with the same linguistic expression. A few exceptions can be explained by different conventions of the Croatian language and the Russian, while, certainly, particular translator’s motivations remain beyond the scope of the research. The observed dominance of the said procedure does not surprise if one takes into account the possibilities of the source and target languages – the Slavic cultural and linguistic heritage which, at least to some extent, enables the understanding of shared concepts and the usage of the same linguistic expressions. The research also proves the potential of corpus anal...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.5