Between the Acts

No. 1 - Year 7 - 12/2016

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

The papers collected within this entr'acte issue use different perspectives and standpoints to explore what happens between the acts – regardless of whether these are acts of a play, acts of speech or some other kind of social intercourse, or – broadly speaking – various acts/actions/activities that pertain to fictional worlds. It could arguably be expected that between the acts there is nothing of significance – utter silence and empty rows of seats in a theatre hall – or some form of light entertainment at best. These spatiotemporal lacunae, vacancies left gaping for however short a time, still possess the power, as all the papers in this issue seem to indicate, to construct and project new meanings of their own, or at the very least create potential for re-interpreting the adjacent ideas and contents, as well as exploring the problems of context, causality and sequence. ...

Literature and Culture
Branka Kovačević, Alfa BK University, Serbia:

This December it will be ninety years since Agatha Christie disappeared for eleven days and despite the fact that there are many biographical books about her life and work, nobody knows for sure what provoked her to vanish, sending shockwaves in British society in 1926. Whatever the cause may be, this disappearance has remained a mystery and inspired French authors Anne Martinetti and Guillaume Lebeau, along with the illustrator Alexandre Franc, to create a graphic novel: Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie. Marinetti has also written a cookbook inspired by Agatha Christie, entitled Creams and Punishments, while together with Lebeau, she has co-authored the encyclopedia Agatha Christie from A to Z.Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie was originally released in 2014 as a French-language Kindle edition and was first published in English in May, 2016 by the UK press SelfMadeHero, which specializes in graphic novels and manga adaptations of classic literature, like those of Shakes...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lc.8
Literature and Culture
Fariba NoorBakhsh and Fazel Asadi Amjad:

Critics have widely explored John Fowles’ The French Lieutenant’s Woman, Graham Swift’s Waterland, and A. S. Byatt’s Possession. These novels are generally treated as outstanding historiographic metafictions since they self-consciously adopt the notion of history and simultaneously problematize historical understanding. For Hayden White, the historian is inevitably impositional and every narrativized history is relative. Following White, Linda Hutcheon defines postmodern historical fiction as the type of fiction that self-reflexively and paradoxically makes use of the notion of history and simultaneously denies its truthfulness. The present article attempts to analyze, compare, and contrast John Fowles’ The French Lieutenant’s Woman, Graham Swift’s Waterland and A. S. Byatt’s Possession: A Romance in light of the theories of White and Hutcheon to show that in spite of problematization of the possibility of recovering the past as it actually was, these novels treat the concept of histor...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lc.2
Literature and Culture
Joshua Adair, Murray State University, USA:

This essay examines the long-standing and far-reaching influence of Oscar Wilde’s public persona – both historical and mythical – on author Beverley Nichols. Nichols, famous during his lifetime for both his non-fiction and reportage, has sustained his fame primarily through his Allways and Merry Hall gardening trilogies. These feature a semi-autobiographical version of the author who is self-styled as a spiritual successor who pays homage to, and extends the legacy of, Oscar Wilde and his endless bon mots, serving up irony, humor, and social commentary in an engaging, urbane manner while further shaping the Wildean identity that prevailed as an iconic gay style throughout much of the last century and that endures, in some forms, even today. Keywords: queer theory, Oscar Wilde, Beverley Nichols, Pet Shop Boys, queer identityOscar Wilde’s final words as his three harrowing trials and, indeed, his remarkably verbal life drew near their close – “And I? May I say nothing, my Lord?” – serve ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lc.3
Literature and Culture
Emilia Musap, University of Zadar, Croatia:

Horror: A Literary History, edited by Xavier Aldana Reyes, is divided into seven chapters which function as separate essays that can be read without having specific knowledge about the horror genre. If read systematically, the book presents an anthological review which establishes the continuity of the genre from 1764 to the early twenty-first century. Even though it privileges theory over textual analysis, the book can be used to elucidate numerous cultural productions and developments that have influenced the simultaneous evolution and devolution of horror by offering a precise insight into the continual interaction of social and literary spheres. Horror: A Literary History is valuable precisely because it questions the devalorizing stances towards the horror genre by acknowledging the importance of various writers who have contributed to the evolution of American and British literature but have often been marginalized because of their tendencies to transgress into the horror genre.

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lc.9
Literature and Culture
Ritika Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India:

This paper examines how short-short stories published on social media platforms such asFacebook and Twitter experiment with brevity. It examines the use of devices such as planned spaces between words, colors, and enjambments, a genre called twitter fiction, to deliver the literary after-taste of ‘byte-sized’ fiction. What are the ramifications, requirements, and results of this form of brevity? Since the works are written and published on/for the digital media, what other aids supplement the reading process, if any? What forms of innovation does this conciseness allow? Two platforms of reading and writing short-short stories (of 140 characters or less) will be used to examine these questions: Terribly Tiny Tales on Facebook and Very Short Story (@veryshortstory)on Twitter. Keywords: digital humanities, twitter fiction, brevity, short story, technology, social mediaThe six-word story by Ernest Hemingway, written in the 1920s, can be seen as an exemplary precursor to the recent burgeoni...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lc.7
Literary Translation
Manfred Kyber and Sanja Matković:

Između ponoći i jednog sata oživi sve ono za što glupi ljudi vjeruju da oživjeti ne može. Ali zaista, mnogobrojne stvari koje inače samo ukočeno i mirno leže, kao da ne mogu reći ni „dobar dan“, sve one u to vrijeme ožive. I ne brinu mnogo o tome vjeruju li glupi ljudi u to ili ne. Tako i u tom starom gradiću oživje sve kada sat sa zvonika crkve Presvete Djevice Marije s dvanaest muklih, teških udaraca otkuca ponoć. Kamenje na pločniku počelo je razgovarati s vlatima trave koja je među njim rasla i pitalo je koliko još misli ostati. Zabati i erkeri kuća u uskim zamršenim uličicama kimali su jedni drugima, a ulične svjetiljke žalile su se na vjetar; prehladile su se jer on tako bezobzirno mijenja smjer.Također oživje sve i u starom vinskom podrumu staroga gradića. Mnogobrojne bačve koje stajahu jedne pokraj drugih, velike i male, zijevnuše i protegnuše se i ispružiše se, a kad bi jedna drugu pritom gurnula, rekla bi: „Oh, tisuću puta oprostite!“ Jer bačve su vrlo pristojne i znaju se li...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.7.lt.3