Art and Subversion

No. 1 - Year 3 - 12/2012

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

When discussing art, regardless of its form, expression, context, genre or any other classifying or defining feature, one of the key issues that constantly emerges as a thing of relevance is its connection to real life, its meaning to our everyday existence, together with its impact on historical, current, and sometimes even future social and cultural aspects of our lives. Within this context the idea of subversion comes to art almost naturally. By constantly reinventing itself, by expanding various social boundaries, which are in fact self-imposed limitations, art (un)successfully subverts everything that stands in its path, creating different approaches to established routines and perceptions, or even completely breaking down all of the traditional notions surrounding a particular segment or phenomena present in society....

Literature and Culture
Tijana Parezanović, Alfa BK University, Serbia:

In his essay on Australian poetry of the early twentieth century, Nicholas Birns claims that the poetry of the given period was not at the time fully appreciated in the rest of the world, and that metropolitan centres placed low esteem on Australian poetic production (173). There was the lack, as he puts it, of “an efficient market”, caused by various factors, including the remoteness and isolation of the country, its distance from the hotspots of political crisis, and its “perceived rejection of modernism” (Ibid). It was the Anglo-American experimental modernism that the young Australian poets rejected, composing verse that “tended to rhyme and obey metrical contentions” (Ibid, 174) or at least have a certain melodic quality. In its stylistic aspect, this poetry was rather traditional, and the themes used were also quite different from those explored by American or English modernist poets: exploration by sea and land, and the European explorations of Australia in particular, was a ver...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lc.2
Literature and Culture
Sintija Čuljat, University of Rijeka, Croatia:

Probing the dramatic monologue mould of Robert Browning (1812-1899) has maintained a long tradition of portraying this poet as an experimenter and pursuer of the Victorian representation de-norming process. Browning’s narrative verse employs ambiguation through syntactic rendition of his dramatic personae who voice their minds beyond the restraints of dialogic turn-taking and divulge their impulses through verbal dominance. Browning’s bicentenary seems a most auspicious moment to creatively explore the tenacity of his discordant narrative vein in literary translation. Browning’s fixation on engendering a poetic form that would fully sustain the self-projecting techniques of his protagonists resulted in the employment of narrative verse whose dialogic nature is undermined and embedded in his creations’ monologues. The poet utilizes innuendoes which originate not only from the pool of poetic references but also from the syntactic realizations disclosing a disparity between the speakers’ ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lc.6
Literary Translation
Eugenia Rico and Anna Rosen Guercio:

You can close your eyes but you can’t close your ears.In the darkness, I keep hearing the screams. I don’t know who’s screaming. I squeeze my eyes tighter and realize that I’m the one who’s screaming. In the darkness, there is no hate. There’s a strange smell and it isn’t me. In another time and another place, someone would have known why all this was happening, someone would have been able to give a name to everything that seems so inexplicable to me, but which does have an explanation. It has to. It won’t be a logical explanation.In another life, I tried to find causes and effects until I came to understand that nothing that happened to me had them. I believed that I thought with my head. I believed that I thought.In the darkness, I don’t think with my heart or with my head. I don’t have any. Others will come and they’ll tell my story. It’ll sound different from their lips.I’ve never been different than everyone else. All my life I endeavored to stay in the middle of the road, not to...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lt.2
Literary Translation
Sergej Dovlatov and Petar Karavlah:

Kuja iz Ureda za vize rekla je: „Svaki emigrant ima pravo na tri kofera. Takva je norma. To su posebni propisi ministarstva.“Nije imalo smisla proturječiti. Ali ipak sam morao: „Samo tri kofera?! Što bih trebao sa stvarima?“„Na primjer?“„Na primjer, sa svojom zbirkom trkaćih auta?“„Prodajte je“, odsutno odgovori službenica. Zatim doda, lagano se namrštivši: „Ako nečim niste zadovoljni, podnesite žalbu.“„Zadovoljan sam.“Nakon zatvora bio sam svime zadovoljan.„Pa onda se i ponašajte tako.“Za tjedan dana već sam pakirao stvari. Ispostavilo se da mi je bio dovoljan jedan jedini kofer. Gotovo sam zaplakao od muke. Pa imao sam trideset i šest godina. Od toga sam osamnaest godina radio. Zaradio bih pa kupio nešto. Mislio sam da imam nekakvu imovinu. A na kraju – jedan kofer. I to prilično skromnih dimenzija. Ispada da sam siromah? Kako je do toga došlo?Knjige? Imao sam uglavnom zabranjene knjige. One nisu prolazile kroz carinu. Morao sam ih podijeliti poznanicima zajedno s takozvanim arhivom.

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lt.5
Literary Translation
Ana Fernández Guerra:

Literary texts display many linguistic peculiarities, as well as social and cultural aspects of our lives and, thus, we can assert that literary translation is one of the main ways of communication across cultures. Translating literary texts, however, is not an easy task, since it certainly poses many problems for the translator. One of the problems a translator can face arises from the fact that some words or phrases denoting objects, facts, phenomena, etc… are so deeply rooted in their source culture (SC) and so specific (and perhaps exclusive or unique) to the culture that produced them that they have no equivalent in the target culture (TC), be it because they are unknown, or because they are not yet codified in the target language (TL). When discussing the problems of correspondence in translation, “differences between cultures may cause more severe complications for the translator than do differences in language structure” (Nida 130). Moreover, several theorists, such as Santoyo,...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lt.1
Literature and Culture
Iva Šarić, independent researcher, Croatia:

Recepcija romana Les Champs d'honneur (1990.) Jeana Rouauda redovito se svodi na isticanje dviju njegovih komponenata: autobiografske i povijesne. Naime, u romanu je riječ o osobnoj i obiteljskoj priči, odnosno nedaćama koje su zatekle jednu skromnu obitelj iz francuske provincije 60-ih godina 20. stoljeća, ali i o zbivanjima iz Prvog svjetskog rata koja su toj priči prethodila. Tomu da romaneskni diskurs vuče na autobiografski pridonijela je usporedba, odnosno analogije iz života autora, Jeana Rouauda, s događajima iz romana, ali i brojne autorove paratekstualne napomene u drugim njegovim djelima gdje on te analogije dodatno naglašava i objašnjava. Riječ je, dakle, o samom po sebi kontradiktornom žanru autobiografskog romana s jedne strane te povijesnom romanu s druge, ako se, pak, takvim može nazvati roman čije se tek jedno jedino poglavlje izravno dotiče prave povijesne materije. Rouaud zapravo subverzira autobiografski i historiografski diskurs u romanu, a na trećoj razini tomu tre...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.3.lc.4