Lively Histories

No. 1 - Year 12 - 12/2021

University of Zadar | eISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

This issue of [sic] marks the end of yet another turbulent year. Looking back at 2021, we take close inspection of not only the past turbulent year but also of the various instances of past times. Times immersed within diverse cultural artifacts, from movies and old collections of stories, to various novels and new ways of living that bring us to something long forgotten....

Literature and Culture
Vincenzo Maria Di Mino, independent researcher, Italy:

In recent decades, the concept of “complexity” has been one of the leitmotifs of social science used to open the conceptual baggage needed to understand the dynamics of “post-modernity,” primarily the composition and structure of society, and the mutations of the technologies of government. Alex Williams, a British political scientist, is best known for the important work Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work, co-written with Nick Srnicek, which posed the politically dense and central problem of the collective use of technologies to “accelerate” the overcoming of capitalism. His latest book, Political Hegemony and Social Complexity: Mechanism of Power After Gramsci, elaborates on some of the diagnoses set out in the previous one, especially those concerning neoliberalism as not merely an economic but a total social phenomenon, and those on the ambivalent, porous, and productive intertwining of politics and technology. The focus on hegemony allows Williams to con...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.10
Literature and Culture
Marijana Jeleč and Iris Spajić:

Contemporary Austrian novels with a family theme go beyond the problematization of two-generational conflicts and tell the story of at least three generations of the family. These are generational novels that often deal with the phenomenon of crisis and the collapse of the family as a result of the crisis. The paper shows that historical caesuras run through the generational novel, showing the causes and consequences of major socio-political changes on the family, which is the basis for all family conflicts in the novel Es geht uns gut (We’re Doing Fine) by Austrian writer Arno Geiger. The approach to the topic begins with a conceptual definition of the crisis and the family, and a reflection on their interconnectedness. When it comes to crisis, the starting point is that it requires a reaction within the community, and that the lack of an appropriate response leads to disintegration; in this particular case it concerns the family but can be reflected in the wider society. The aim of t...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.6
Literature and Culture
Marija Ratković, independent researcher, Serbia:

This paper explores the politics of Holocaust representations without dealing with the problem of the ethics of the representation itself, but rather indirectly: by asking what the strengths and limitations of film media representation are, it deals with the problem of the politic/politics of the Holocaust cinema. Furthermore, it looks at the heteronomies of a certain number of movies in relation to the autonomous field of art which also sets limitations of the media, especially by taking into account the dominant social contexts, politics, and the approved representational ethics. By applying the case study method to three documentary films – Night and Fog (1995) by Alain Resnais, Shoah (1985) by Claude Lanzmann, and Respite (2007) by Harun Farocki, what is being presented is the discrepancy between the concepts of politics and ethics of Holocaust representation. The chosen films represent three different points in time and three different dominant and avant-garde discourses of Holoca...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.3
Literature and Culture
Senka Božić - Vrbančić and Sanja Đurin:

Life insecurity and precariousness caused by neoliberal capitalist activities as well as the consequences that are felt worldwide as global crises (environmental, economic, migrant, health crisis) have a great impact on people and their sense of living a viable life, a “life that is worth of living.” These circumstances create new forms of life – a life without the promise of stability and without a sense of security. However, with the feeling of insecurity, the promotion of anti-stress activities grows, such as outdoor activities (hiking, walking in nature, running, visiting nature parks, etc.). In this text, inspired by affect theories (Berlant, Ahmed) we analyze different perceptions of nature landscapes (mountains, nature parks in Croatia). We ask: how “nature” is experienced in a social atmosphere marked by different crises and which possibilities emerge from different imaginaries about nature.Keywords: historical present, perception of nature, social atmosphere, consumerism

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.1
Literature and Culture
Ana Klopotan, University of Zagreb, Croatia:

The purpose of this paper is to compare the ways professional and unprofessional readers write about literature. The analyzed corpora will consist of three blogs dedicated to literature (the unprofessional, N corpus) and book reviews published in two professional publications (the professional, P corpus). The criteria for choosing the texts that would enter the corpora were a relatively solid readership and the same publication period. By using digital tools such as Sketch Engine and MAXQDA 2020, the following data was analyzed: the titles and authors mentioned, most frequent words and most frequent multi-word terms. Based on these macro-level results, a few texts were chosen for a deeper, sentence-level analysis. The results were compared to similar research regarding unprofessional readers.Keywords: professional readers, unprofessional readers, reader reception, book blogs, digital humanitiesDigitalna revolucija utjecala je ne samo na sam medij književnosti, već i na način govora i i...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.8
Literature and Culture
Nikica Gilić, University of Zagreb, Croatia:

The characters of Živojin Pavlović’s seminal film The Rats Woke Up (Buđenje Pacova, 1967), regularly discussed in the context of the Yugoslav Black Wave cinema, offer significant and very intriguing figures of dissent. The film depicts misfits, bottom-dwellers, and dissidents living on the margins of society in the largest and capital city of Belgrade at a time when Black Wave authors have been breaking some new grounds for Yugoslav cinema and influencing artists well after the movement became a part of history. This essay concentrates on the characters and their interaction, the complexity of which suggests the complexity of Pavlović’s criticism of everyday life and institutions in the 1960s Yugoslavia.Keywords: Živojin Pavlović, The Rats Woke Up, Black Wave, Belgrade, figures of dissent, film criticism, Yugoslav cinemaHistorical studies of socialist Yugoslav cinema often place special emphasis on the Black Wave tendency of the 1960s and early 1970s (Goulding), sometimes even consider...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.2