Lively Histories

No. 1 - Year 12 - 12/2021

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

This issue of [sic] marks the end of yet another turbulent year. Looking back at 2021, we take close inspection of not only the past turbulent year but also of the various instances of past times. Times immersed within diverse cultural artifacts, from movies and old collections of stories, to various novels and new ways of living that bring us to something long forgotten....

Literature and Culture
Senka Božić - Vrbančić and Sanja Đurin:

Life insecurity and precariousness caused by neoliberal capitalist activities as well as the consequences that are felt worldwide as global crises (environmental, economic, migrant, health crisis) have a great impact on people and their sense of living a viable life, a “life that is worth of living.” These circumstances create new forms of life – a life without the promise of stability and without a sense of security. However, with the feeling of insecurity, the promotion of anti-stress activities grows, such as outdoor activities (hiking, walking in nature, running, visiting nature parks, etc.). In this text, inspired by affect theories (Berlant, Ahmed) we analyze different perceptions of nature landscapes (mountains, nature parks in Croatia). We ask: how “nature” is experienced in a social atmosphere marked by different crises and which possibilities emerge from different imaginaries about nature.Keywords: historical present, perception of nature, social atmosphere, consumerism

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.1
Literature and Culture
Rafaela Božić and Antonia Pintarić:

The aim of this paper is to research the translation procedures of metaphors for LOVE in the novel Chevengur by Andrei Platonov by using a corpus linguistics search tool to explore the potential of corpus analysis in literary translation. The research shows that the analyzed translation is dominated by the M M procedure, that is, translation with the same conceptual metaphor and, more precisely, with the same linguistic expression. A few exceptions can be explained by different conventions of the Croatian language and the Russian, while, certainly, particular translator’s motivations remain beyond the scope of the research. The observed dominance of the said procedure does not surprise if one takes into account the possibilities of the source and target languages – the Slavic cultural and linguistic heritage which, at least to some extent, enables the understanding of shared concepts and the usage of the same linguistic expressions. The research also proves the potential of corpus anal...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.5
Literature and Culture
Vincenzo Maria Di Mino, independent researcher, Italy:

In recent decades, the concept of “complexity” has been one of the leitmotifs of social science used to open the conceptual baggage needed to understand the dynamics of “post-modernity,” primarily the composition and structure of society, and the mutations of the technologies of government. Alex Williams, a British political scientist, is best known for the important work Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work, co-written with Nick Srnicek, which posed the politically dense and central problem of the collective use of technologies to “accelerate” the overcoming of capitalism. His latest book, Political Hegemony and Social Complexity: Mechanism of Power After Gramsci, elaborates on some of the diagnoses set out in the previous one, especially those concerning neoliberalism as not merely an economic but a total social phenomenon, and those on the ambivalent, porous, and productive intertwining of politics and technology. The focus on hegemony allows Williams to con...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.10
Literature and Culture
Sanghamitra Dalal, MARA University of Technology, Malaysia:

In this paper, I will refer to the Malaysian Migrant Worker and Refugee Poetry Competition and the subsequent collection of the selected entries entitled Voices of the Displaced. I will contend that this opportunity of showcasing the literary and cultural agency of traditionally peripheral migration in Malaysia is effectively instrumental in generating an alternative perspective in addressing the existing discourse of migration and diaspora. Therefore, I will propose that the notion of “local modernities,” as professed by Bill Ashcroft, is an appropriate articulation in order to locate this contemporary cultural contingency. Consequently, I will attempt to argue that the emerging diasporic interspaces of local modernities in Malaysia are capable of not only creating shifting spaces and practices where participatory negotiation of sameness and difference can be sustained, but also of initiating a polylogue that represents the distinctive divergences.Keywords: migration, diaspora, local ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.7
Literature and Culture
Goran Đurđević, Beijing Foreign Studies University, China:

Knjiga Ant Spider Bee: Chronicling Digital Transformations in Environmental Humanities istodobno obuhvaća dva nova, zanimljiva i drugačija područja humanistike – digitalnu i ekološku/okolišnu humanistiku. Budući da su dva navedena polja veoma kompatibilna i popularna, očekivano je da će doći do premrežavanja i prožimanja u novu disciplinu nazvanu digitalna ekohumanistika. Taj se proces i događa kroz posljednjih nekoliko godina – projekti poput Digital Environmental Humanities na Sveučilištu McGill u Kanadi, The Digital Environmental Humanities na Sveučilištu Umea u Švedskoj, Environment and Society na Sveučilištu LMU u Münchenu itd., zatim počeci sveučilišne nastave iz digitalne ekohumanistike na spomenutim sveučilištima. Upravo su potonja dva projekta (iz Švedske i Njemačke) iznjedrila blog Ant Spider Bee (Mrav pauk pčela), pokrenut 2011. pod uredničkom palicom trojca Kimberly Coulter, Wilko Graf von Hardenberg i Finn Arne Jorgensen. Duhovito nazvan prema usporedbi o mravima, paucima ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.9
Literature and Culture
Lidija Štrmelj, University of Zadar, Croatia:

This article aims to identify conceptual metaphors in the Middle English text of The Miller’s Prologue and The Miller’s Tale and to find their equivalents in the Croatian translation done by Luko Paljetak, in order to deduce which metaphors are conventional in both languages and cultures. The investigation of conventionality will be based on the comparison of source concepts in English and Croatian linguistic expressions used in conceiving of metaphorical targets. Metaphors in both languages will be classified according to their cognitive function into structural, ontological, and orientational, which will appoint to the type(s) of metaphors with the greatest and smallest amount of overlapping. Finally, the analysis will lead to the conclusion whether the differences in metaphor usage in two languages are the consequence of cognitive differences between their speakers or the consequence of socio-cultural development that took place in the period of about 600 years which have passed bet...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.12.lc.4