Multiple Exposure

No. 2 - Year 8 - 06/2018

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

This issue of [sic] plays with the technique of multiple exposure, which we borrow from photography. In a similar way that the superimposition of several exposures creates a single and unique image, so all the articles here presented individually deal with different overlapping concepts, which produce distinctive images, texts, and readings. Thus, for example, superimposing Nigerian traditional practices on Shakespeare’s themes creates a unique phenomenon in modern Nigerian theater; similarly, Christmas customs in Croatia, overlapping the fantasy of J.R.R. Tolkien, form a particular product intended for the child reader. Additionally, this [sic] also engages in a game of meaning, working around the polysemy of the word exposure. To this effect, the presented selection of articles deals with exposure as appearance in various (multiple) digital sources, the exposure of the viewers to multifarious effects cinema can have, or the exposure (revelation) of the ideas underlying the translation process. ...

Literature and Culture
Mark Gagnon, United States Military Academy, USA:

During the 1950s, West German cinemas screened approximately 600 war films, nearly ten percent of the domestic production. Faulting these features for their avoidance of significant issues such as the causes of World War II, the Holocaust, or the Wehrmacht’s misdeeds and atrocities, previous commentators have in the main focused on the failure of these films to engage the past in a thoroughgoing manner. As a response to this criticism, my essay will show how Frank Wisbar’s Dogs, Do You Want to Live Forever? (1959), a feature film about the Battle of Stalingrad, provides a conversion narrative that corresponds to the needs of the Adenauer era. As this film looks back to its past, it simultaneously looks forward and promotes the values of a new and emerging democracy.Keywords: Battle of Stalingrad, war films, Adenauer era, 1950s West German Cinema, World War IIWest German war films of the 1950s attempted to negotiate a problematic past through a variety of narratives. Alfred Weidenmann’s...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lc.5
Literature and Culture
Lekan Balogun, University of Lagos, Nigeria:

Several contemporary adaptations of Shakespeare address important, as well as ongoing, socio-cultural and political situations in their various societies. While this approach suggests collaboration with Shakespeare rather than contesting of the colonial political and cultural hegemony that the English Bard privileges, it also underlines the influence that Shakespeare has on the writers and cultures with which he has been in contact. From the perspective of collaboration with Shakespeare through Othello, this essay examines Ahmed Yerima’s Otaelo, which dramatizes the debilitating and tragic effects of the Osu practice among the Igbo people of southeast Nigeria and emphasizes the play’s strong echoes of other plays by Shakespeare, including Hamlet, The Merchant of Venice, and Titus Andronicus. Yerima’s play underlines how adaptation makes it possible to view the relationship between an older writer and a young (or new) one in the context of both influence and collaboration.

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lc.4
Literature and Culture
Nada Kujundžić, University of Turku, Finland:

The paper analyzes the Croatian translation of a collection of J.R.R. Tolkien’s letters to his children – the posthumously published Father Christmas Letters (1976). Situated within the theoretical and methodological framework of descriptive translation studies, the paper will examine specific translation strategies and tactics utilized to make the text more comprehensible and accessible to the target (child) audience, thus demonstrating that the translator, Zlatko Crnković, is first and foremost translating for children. The analysis is focused on the level of content (with special emphasis on culture-specific items) and style. By examining one of Tolkien’s “minor” works and its translation into a “minor” language, the paper aims to address underscrutinized areas within Tolkien, translation, and children’s literature studies. Keywords: children’s literature, Father Christmas Letters, J.R.R. Tolkien, Pisma Djeda Božićnjaka, translation strategies

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lc.8
Literary Translation
Carlos Fonseca and Ela Varošanec:

1.Na trenutke, u tišini nastanjenoj krajolikom, jedino što se može čuti jest bljeskalica fotografskog aparata. U tom kratkom trenutku postoje samo on, kamera i kadar koji će ostati zabilježen za budućnost koju još ne zna, ali na tu je kartu stavio sve. Samo u tom kratkom trenutku ne postoji ništa osim njega i njegove vjere. Njega i njegove budućnosti. Potom ga, suptilno, prekida ona kratka zvučna katastrofa koja ga vraća natrag u prašumu: tropska šuma koja ječi i vrije u pozadini, kakofonija ptica, graja slobodnih kokoši, hrkanje umornog Indijanca, štucanje pijanog Engleza. Još dalje, na grozno jedinstvenom i bolnom mjestu, jecaji kćeri čije jauke tek sada ponovno čuje.Tek tada odvaja oči od kamere i pogleda je.Jedva joj je deset godina, pogled težak od nesanice i strašno bljedilo koji ga podsjete na one nordijske širine koje nikada nije posjetio. Pokraj djevojčice, žena zasljepljujuće ljepote, lijevom rukom čiji oblik i predobro poznaje, umiruje jecaje djevojčice. Drugom rukom, njegov...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lt.1
Literature and Culture
Mirna Sindičić Sabljo, University of Zadar, Croatia:

Just like tomorrow (Kiffe kiffe demain), a novel written by the French author Faize Guene, was published in 2004. Shortly after its publication, the novel was translated into twenty foreign languages. The Croatian translation appeared in 2006. Kiffe kiffe demain describes a year in the life of a teenage girl of Moroccan origin, living in one of the suburbs in northern Paris. The novel is written mostly in slang. The aim of this paper is to analyse the lexical, grammatical and syntactic specifics of the language in which the novel was written, to determine the difficulties that the translator encountered in translating them, and to analyze the Croatian translation of the novel Kiffe kiffe demain. The analysis is based on close reading and comparative analysis of the original text and its translation, taking into account the linguistic, stylistic, textual, and cultural issues relevant to the translation. Comparative analysis of the original and the translation, apart from their philologi...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lc.9
Literature and Culture
Marko Vučetić, University of Zadar, Croatia:

This article discusses the relationship between anthropology and art in the philosophical work of contemporary Croatian philosopher Raimundo Kupareo. Anthropology is the study of man, and art is the study or manifestation of human presence. Man is a being of value that connects mysticism and rationality, knowledge and emotions, idea and matter, anthropology and art. The possibility of a touch between anthropology and art allows for the avoidance of dichotomous tendencies of separation between art and anthropology, works and authors. The artistic process, viewed from anthropological positions, is the process of rise and resurrection of the artist as the author and his/her work as a particular value. The author has been legitimized in the world as a being that conceives different ideas and is able to express them in matter, while his work has been publicly presented as a true, human value without the predetermined exclusivity of belonging to someone. That man presents a value, the same a...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/2.8.lc.1