Altered States

No. 1 - Year 8 - 12/2017

University of Zadar | eISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

Non-thematic issues always represent a challenge, mostly premised on defining and constructing a subtle thread that would, at least apparently, unify all of the numerous submitted papers, thoughts and opinions about a variety of different subjects. Sometimes the final product, the metaphoric body of our journal, is a harmonious and perhaps even optimistic reading of cultural, social and literary phenomena, while on some other occasions the projected and articulated themes and ideas tend to be a bit harsher, stronger and more explicit in their nature. Such is the issue in front of you; in spite of the cheerful and celebratory time of the year, the segment dedicated to culture and literature is defined by the somewhat gloomy overtones of the presented ideas, merging silently with the foreboding shadows and the unfriendly figure insidiously dominating our cover. However, the articulated themes and analyses, while inclined toward the darker states and altered perceptions of reality, still form a rich tapestry of research and scrutiny, actively and significantly contributing to contemporary debates on the subjects at hand....

Literature and Culture
Ana Fazekaš, University of Zagreb, Croatia:

Rape is a crime so close and personal, a trauma so individual, yet an experience so grotesquely impersonal, collective and inherent in our culture that it has a distinct place in the artistic practice of many feminist authors fighting for a voice where the cry had been muffled, refusing to be reframed into another masculinist fantasy of violence. Resistance through performance art as a mode of expression, its power and limitations, is what this article attempts to approach and start to untangle. When it comes to the artistic mode that prides itself most on its closeness to life and body – when there is pain, the pain is real – this paper aims to answer the following questions: how does one approach a violent invasion of a person’s body and self in a culture that perpetuates the mass psychology of rape (Brownmiller), and what can it mean to those who stand by and watch? Keywords: rape, feminism, performance art, autobiography, representation, representability, pain

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.lc.1
Literature and Culture
Tamara Jevrić, Priština University in Kosovska Mitrovica, Kosovo:

Frequent lexical patterns can explain how language, society and culture interact. In this paper, we analyze the most frequent adjectival collocates which precede lemmas WOMAN and MAN, by searching the node words woman, women, man and men in the British National Corpus (BNC) using the statistical procedure list. The primary postulate is that frequent collocational patterns reveal common societal and cultural concepts. The research is based on Sinclair’s theory about how frequency points to what is typical and central in a language (17). Furthermore, Stubbs’s understanding of a community’s value system being built up and maintained by the recurrent use of particular phrasings in texts (Words and Phrases 166) is explored through the repetition of lexical patterns in the corpus, thus exposing dominant cultural models. Keywords: WOMAN, MAN, BNC, frequency, collocates, language, society, cultureMichael Stubbs’s principle that “language in use transmits the culture,” by which he provides his ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.lc.2
Literature and Culture
Artea Panajotović, Alfa BK University, Serbia:

The paper examines some of the Gothic features used in character development in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! and Toni Morrison’s Beloved, and explores how the two novels complement each other to form a comprehensive picture of the American South around the Civil War. In the traditions of Gothic realism and postcolonial Gothic respectively, the authors describe the 19th-century South as populated with supernatural beings: demoniac slaveholders, monsters who try to fight oppression, zombies whose souls have been devoured by the oppressive system, ghosts and revenants who return to haunt their wrongdoers, and hybrids whose transgressive nature is feared by the oppressors and the oppressed alike.Keywords: American Gothic, American South, character development, slavery, hybrids, monsters, ghostsEven though, as Allan Lloyd Smith points out in his survey of the 19th-century American Gothic, American writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Nathaniel Hawthorne complained that the New Wor...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.lc.4
Literary Translation
Marina Tsvetaeva and Mary Jane White:

11 October 192224 October 192235 October 192223 September 19224 August 1923

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.lt.1
Catalan Poetry Translation Workshop
Nikola Vuletić and Tomislav Kuzmanović:

Radionica prevođenja katalonske poezije / Mali Pašman 2017.Dragi čitatelju,Pred tobom je plod rada grupe prevoditelja i dvoje katalonskih pjesnika koji su se sastali na radionici prevođenja katalonske poezije u svibnju 2017. godine na otoku Pašmanu. U temeljima priče ovoga, sada već dugogodišnjeg, prevodilačkog projekta, slobodno se može reći, stoji prvi katalonski lektor na Sveučilištu u Zadru, Pau Sanchis Ferrer, ujedno i pjesnik koji objavljuje pod pseudonimom Pau Sif. Pau je 2010. sudjelovao na 19. izdanju seminara prevođenja poezije u organizaciji Institució de les Lletres Catalanes, koji se tradicionalno održava u Farrera de Pallars, zabačenom mjestu u katalonskim Pirenejima. Tom su se prilikom na katalonski prevodile pjesme Marka Pogačara i Dinka Telećana. Potom je Pau predložio da se neka vrst uzvratnog susreta održi kod nas, u Hrvatskoj, u Zadru, u sličnim uvjetima. To se zbilo već u prosincu 2010, uz potporu različitih katalonskih institucija i našega Ministarstva kulture. Iz...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.cptw.1
Literature and Culture
Emilia Musap, University of Zadar, Croatia:

This paper begins by offering a brief overview of the popular culture narrative Crimson Peak (2015), directed by Guillermo del Toro. The analysis focuses on the most compelling Gothic trope del Toro reintroduces, the proverbial mansion, simultaneously displaying Freud’s heimlich and unheimlich elements, oppressing and liberating its inhabitants. Since the narrative revolves around two female protagonists, Lucille Sharpe and Edith Cushing, the paper also refers to feminist socio-cultural perspectives on space, primarily Gillian Rose’s and Shelley Mallett’s, in order to understand the position of the two protagonists within the decidedly Gothic space. This paper aims to emphasize that Lucille’s liberation as the mistress of the house is illusory regardless of the fact that she is represented as the embodiment of domestic corruption. It is precisely because she is a sexually active woman and a disruptor of the patriarchal order that she must ultimately be punished. Even though del Toro su...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.8.lc.3