(Dis)placements

No. 1 - Year 6 - 12/2015

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

The point at which all the texts collected in this issue of [sic] converge is the contended problem of (non-)belonging to a certain physical or imaginary place, with the accompanying experience of being displaced, replaced, or misplaced. The anxiety of displacement creates an increasing need – now perhaps more visible in contemporary societies than ever before– to move beyond the existing boundaries and limitations in a perpetual search of a place of one’s own, or otherwise place the fragmented experience of life within some spatial framework. Various aspects of and approaches to the broad concept and forms of displacement(s) provide the basis for considerations of artistic, literary and social phenomena offered by [sic]’s authors. ...

Literature and Culture
Christian Giguere, Université du Québec a Trois-Rivieres, Canada:

This paper examines the influence of Aristotle’s theory of place (topos) on the conceptualization of cultural universality. Its main focus is in reinvesting the thought of Baruch Spinoza and Henri Bergson surrounding the fossilized spatial boundaries that limit understanding in order to scrutinize both the virtual and figurative processes inherent to the sketching of a universal human plane outside of local custom in certain literary works. This investigation yields a concept of “figurative agency” that is then delineated in the Tao Te Ching and Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in order to demonstrate how the concept might serve as a bridge between the extended space of a national culture and the virtual plane invested by world literature.Keywords: world literature, Henri Bergson, Spinoza, figurative agency, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Tao Te-Ching, literary epistemology

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.2
Literature and Culture
I. Murat Öner and Mustafa Bal:

Transgressivity, in a broad sense, denotes a state of movement from one distinct position, mode, or territory to another, be it spatial, geographical, mental, spiritual, or even narrative. Transgression occurs when one crosses boundaries, in other words, limes of different entities. Geocritical transgressivity, which is a multifaceted concept, may lead to a variety of interpretations at many different strata. Transgressivity finds echoes in Caryl Phillips’s narratives, at times in geographical forms, where a deterritorialized character crosses borders without ever gaining reterritorialization, at other times, in his fragmented narration where the reader stands at a threshold. Our paper uses Phillips’s A New World Order (2001) in particular as a key text through this geocritical lens of transgressivity to see to what extent it functions as the author’s map legend that presents a cartographic pattern of his writing in general. Our discussion also focuses on Phillips’s distinct analyses i...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.3
Literature and Culture
Atila Lukić, University of Zadar, Croatia:

Disability studies has a history of distinguishing the “dichotomy” between the biological and the cultural identity of the body and the attempts to deal with this conflict. Identity is divided into two registers of knowledge: the corporeality of the body and cultural ideas about the normal body. In his former two books, Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body (1995) and Bending over Backwards: Disability, Dismodernism & Other Difficult Positions (1995), Lenard Davis tries to locate these focal points of entanglement between the biological and cultural. In Enforcing Normalcy, Davis attempts to analyze the historical origin and instrumentalization of the concept of the normal body (2), whilst in Bending over Backwards, he introduces the critical concept of dismodernism – a way of rethinking postmodern concerns with identity and how these relate to disability studies (27-31). In his third book, The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era, Davis explores a wholly new av...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.9
Literature and Culture
Yi-Lee Wong, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong:

This article is about twelve middle-class students, previously studying in elite primary and secondary schools, making another attempt at getting into university in Hong Kong. Despite their failure at a critical educational stage, which contradicts a general pattern of middle-class educational success, they decide to seek a second chance by reading an associate degree in community college, a perceived inferior educational option. Despite feeling determined, they are anxious and uneasy with taking up this option. How the middle class feel about their academic pursuits, especially after a critical failure, is under-researched. This article attempts to fill this gap by referring to Bourdieu’s notions of habitus and field to make sense of the complex or contradictory feelings of 12 students with a self-conscious, high-status, middle-class habitus in encountering a perceived low-status community college. I shall conclude this article with the normative implication of our discussion in makin...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.6
Literature and Culture
Gordan Maslov, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia:

Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One opens with the claim that “It should not be surprising that Marx remains as inexhaustible as capital itself, and that with every adaptation or mutation of the latter his texts and his thought resonate in new ways and with fresh accents … rich with new meanings” (Jameson 1). Together with Valences of the Dialectic (2009), this is Fredric Jameson's latest chapter in a life-long project of actualization and affirmation of different categories of Marx’s dialectic, from alienation to commodity fetishism, all thoroughly criticized and somewhat abandoned after the (post)structuralist turn of Marxism in the late 1960s and early 1970s. By positing the category of representation in the center of his reading of Capital, Jameson is moving against the current of those appropriations of Marx that amidst the unprecedented global financial crisis of 2008, aimed to find their foothold in the supposed objectivity of the economy – projecting onto the economy ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.10
Literary Translation
Ramsey Campbell and Tanja Jurković:

Edgeworth je na televiziji gledao memoare o autobusnoj vožnji u Hitchcockovom uratku Sretni Jim kad je zazvonio telefon. Pauzirao je posebno kolekcionarsko izdanje Obiteljske zavjere i podigao stražnji dio naslonjača. Posegnuvši za slušalicom, primijetio je kako su kazaljke na satu zatrzale prema ponoći. „Halo?“ rekao je, pa za manje od sekunde ponovio: „Halo?“„Je li to gospodin Edgeworth?“Nije prepoznao ženin glas premda nije niti znao neku ženu koja bi ga imala razloga nazvati. „Pri telefonu“, rekao je.„Gospodin Eric Edgeworth?“„Još uvijek niste u krivu.“„Imate li par minuta, gospodine Edgeworth?“„Ne treba mi popravak kompjutora. Nisam imao nesreću na radu, niti bilo gdje drugdje. Ne kupujem ništa i neću vam reći gdje i što kupujem. Moji politički stavovi su moja stvar, kao i sve ostalo o čemu trenutačno razmišljam. Nisam nikad pobijedio na natjecanju, tako da se nemojte niti truditi tvrditi drugačije. Ne idem na godišnji u inozemstvo, tako da mi ne morate niti pokušavati prodati neš...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lt.4