(Dis)placements

No. 1 - Year 6 - 12/2015

University of Zadar | ISSN 1847-7755 | SIC.JOURNAL.CONTACT@GMAIL.COM

Editorial

The point at which all the texts collected in this issue of [sic] converge is the contended problem of (non-)belonging to a certain physical or imaginary place, with the accompanying experience of being displaced, replaced, or misplaced. The anxiety of displacement creates an increasing need – now perhaps more visible in contemporary societies than ever before– to move beyond the existing boundaries and limitations in a perpetual search of a place of one’s own, or otherwise place the fragmented experience of life within some spatial framework. Various aspects of and approaches to the broad concept and forms of displacement(s) provide the basis for considerations of artistic, literary and social phenomena offered by [sic]’s authors. ...

Literary Translation
Cristina Peri Rossi and Meg Berkobien:

She looked loathingly at the spoon. It was a metal spoon, dark, with a small engraving on its handle – a sharp taste. “Open your mouth, slowly, eaaaasy, like a little birdie in its nest,” he said, bringing the spoon to her mouth. He hated spoons; they had seemed despicable little things since he was small. Why did he now find himself having to wield it, full of soup, having to usher it now into this young child’s mouth, as his parents had done to him, as surely as his parents’ parents had also done? If they even had spoons then, if some fool had already invented them. He had to find himself an encyclopedia and figure out when the first spoon had been forged; he had to get his hands on an encyclopedia, a source of infinite knowledge by which he might survive. Spoon: A piece of silverware with a concave scoop at its end; typically used for carrying liquids to the mouth.

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lt.3
Literature and Culture
Atila Lukić, University of Zadar, Croatia:

Disability studies has a history of distinguishing the “dichotomy” between the biological and the cultural identity of the body and the attempts to deal with this conflict. Identity is divided into two registers of knowledge: the corporeality of the body and cultural ideas about the normal body. In his former two books, Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness, and the Body (1995) and Bending over Backwards: Disability, Dismodernism & Other Difficult Positions (1995), Lenard Davis tries to locate these focal points of entanglement between the biological and cultural. In Enforcing Normalcy, Davis attempts to analyze the historical origin and instrumentalization of the concept of the normal body (2), whilst in Bending over Backwards, he introduces the critical concept of dismodernism – a way of rethinking postmodern concerns with identity and how these relate to disability studies (27-31). In his third book, The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era, Davis explores a wholly new av...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.9
Literary Translation
Korana Serdarević and Una Krizmanić Ožegović:

“My darling sister, you have a hole in your butt,” Ivka says in all seriousness, as if relating a particularly important discovery. Children giggle and point fingers at the torn up stitching right in the middle of Tona’s round butt. Tona has just bent over while dragging the wooden stool from the kitchen, and now, broad and strong, she stands up next to the stone table. Villagers let go of their chatting and prick their ears up. There is a smile lurking at the corner of their lips – they know what their Tona is all about. Even now, when you can clearly make out her white panties under the wide, colourful skirt, it doesn’t cross her mind to cover the hole with her hand, let alone feel embarrassed. On the contrary, it’s as if she has been waiting for fancy Miss Ivka to slap that remark in the middle of a hot summer afternoon. Her tiny eyes pop with delight and people know her tongue, so sharp and witty, is half way out to snap back at Ivka.“First, it’s not a hole, it’s a cranny,” she fir...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lt.2
Literary Translation
Ramsey Campbell and Tanja Jurković:

Edgeworth je na televiziji gledao memoare o autobusnoj vožnji u Hitchcockovom uratku Sretni Jim kad je zazvonio telefon. Pauzirao je posebno kolekcionarsko izdanje Obiteljske zavjere i podigao stražnji dio naslonjača. Posegnuvši za slušalicom, primijetio je kako su kazaljke na satu zatrzale prema ponoći. „Halo?“ rekao je, pa za manje od sekunde ponovio: „Halo?“„Je li to gospodin Edgeworth?“Nije prepoznao ženin glas premda nije niti znao neku ženu koja bi ga imala razloga nazvati. „Pri telefonu“, rekao je.„Gospodin Eric Edgeworth?“„Još uvijek niste u krivu.“„Imate li par minuta, gospodine Edgeworth?“„Ne treba mi popravak kompjutora. Nisam imao nesreću na radu, niti bilo gdje drugdje. Ne kupujem ništa i neću vam reći gdje i što kupujem. Moji politički stavovi su moja stvar, kao i sve ostalo o čemu trenutačno razmišljam. Nisam nikad pobijedio na natjecanju, tako da se nemojte niti truditi tvrditi drugačije. Ne idem na godišnji u inozemstvo, tako da mi ne morate niti pokušavati prodati neš...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lt.4
Literature and Culture
Katarina Žeravica, Sveučilište Josipa Jurja Strossmayera, Croatia:

Gwen Pharis Ringwood (1910–1984) is one of the most eminent Canadian playwrights of the 20th century. In her drama Drum Song: An Indian Trilogy which consists of three parts: Maya (Lament for Harmonica, 1959), The Stranger (1971) and The Furies (1981) the author implements her knowledge of First Nations’ traditions and customs. Moreover, it is “in the lives of the Indian tribes [that] Gwen Ringwood had found an elemental struggle for survival that has produced conflicts comparable with those of Greek tragedy” (Perkyns 330). Such conflicts and elements characteristic of Greek tragedy find their place in this trilogy as well. Therefore, the aim of the paper is to analyse those elements, examine their function, the way and form in which they are presented in the trilogy. Keywords: Canada, drama, First Nations, Gwen Ringwood, tradition, tragedy, trilogy

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.5
Literature and Culture
Gordan Maslov, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia:

Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One opens with the claim that “It should not be surprising that Marx remains as inexhaustible as capital itself, and that with every adaptation or mutation of the latter his texts and his thought resonate in new ways and with fresh accents … rich with new meanings” (Jameson 1). Together with Valences of the Dialectic (2009), this is Fredric Jameson's latest chapter in a life-long project of actualization and affirmation of different categories of Marx’s dialectic, from alienation to commodity fetishism, all thoroughly criticized and somewhat abandoned after the (post)structuralist turn of Marxism in the late 1960s and early 1970s. By positing the category of representation in the center of his reading of Capital, Jameson is moving against the current of those appropriations of Marx that amidst the unprecedented global financial crisis of 2008, aimed to find their foothold in the supposed objectivity of the economy – projecting onto the economy ...

DOI: 10.15291/sic/1.6.lc.10