Future Insights

No. 2 - Year 9 - 06/2019

Editorial

The articles presented in the 18th issue of [sic] discuss, in broad terms, the ways in which literary and cultural phenomena manage to transcend the temporal and spatial framework into which they were born. They thus provide understandings and intuitions with continuing relevance, and their impact extends – regardless of when they were created – well into the future. In the opening article, Dejan Durić and Željka Matijašević analyze the concept of intensity through psychoanalytic lenses, as it evolves from the 1960s counterculture toward the present-day forms of capitalism. Krešimir Vuković delves into the imagery of classical literature and explores what insights Homer, Hesiod, and Callimachus offered for future authors. Finally, Korana Serdarević turns toward teaching methodology and tackles the issue of whether 19th century literature can help shape the views of today’s (and tomorrow’s) society. ..

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Featuring

From Homer’s Odyssey and Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe to Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, the sea has always featured prominently in Western literature. Stories of voyages over (or under) boundless oceans, tales of mutiny and piracy, of treasure and adventure, have all become an integral part of our literary tradition. And while it was frequently admired, the sea’s capricious nature and fathomless depths have often led to it being feared in equal measure. Compiled and edited by Mike Ashley, From the Depths and Other Strange Tales of the Sea is an anthology comprising fifteen lesser known stories taken from other collections and pulp magazines dating back to the early 20th century, which ably illustrates that period’s fascination with the sea, especially with its more fantastical and uncanny aspects.The collection opens strongly with an invitingly horrific, if somewhat traditional ghost ship story. Albert A. Wetjen’s “The Ship of Silence” draws heavily both from legends like the Flying Dutchman and real-world mysteries like the Mary Celeste. An abandoned ship’s fate is revealed through the frenzied screeching of a parrot, the ship’s sole survivor, as it repeats the words of the doomed crew in their final moments. Bearing more than a passing resemblance to many of H. P. Lovecraft’s stories, the horror here lies not so much in what is shown, but in what is left to the reader’s imagination. Morgan Robertson’s “From the Darkness and the Depths” continues in the same vein and also features a ship assailed by invisible terrors. It is one of a number of stories from the period which emphasize, and often overestimate, the power of science and its ability to combat forces unfathomable to the human mind....

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The idea of the landlord's estate as “paradise on land,” traditional in the Russian culture of the late 19th and early 20th century, evolved in the literature of the 1910s and 1920s into the idea of the city-garden, which united the “beginning” and “ends” of the image of Biblical paradise – the Old Testament Eden and the Apocalyptic New Jerusalem. The substrate of the city-garden mythologem became the "estate topos," which indicates its plasticity and significant heuristic potential, i.e. not only its belonging to the former landowner estate of the 19th century, but also its ability to create new cultural modifications, such as the “city of the future” by V. V. Khlebnikov or the “city garden” in the prose of A. N. Tolstoy and in the Soviet poetry of the 1920s.Keywords: paradise, topics, landowner estate, estate topos, “city of the future,” “city-garden,” the first third of the 20th century, A. N. Tolstoy, V. V. Khlebnikov, V. V. Mayakovsky...

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Novinar je najavio prilog o još jednoj pucnjavi, nakon čega su počele reklame. Još jednog nenaoružanog crnog tinejdžera ustrijelio je još jedan bijeli policajac. Nakon toga, džingl na jedanaestom programu prekinula je djevojčica kovrčave kose, koja je gđu Mendez podsjećala na njezinu Eloisu prije nego što je ova postala mrzovoljna tinejdžerka. Eloisina dvojnica pogledom je tražila ubruse. Mlijeko iz pahuljica prolila je po netaknutom kuhinjskom šanku, a njezina majka iz reklame istoga je trena počistila nered s osmijehom na licu iz kojeg se moglo iščitati, kako si samo dražesna svaki put kad zasereš kuću.„Opet ista priča”, rekla je gđa Mendez mužu. Nije joj bilo jasno zašto uporno želi gledati vijesti – sve te stravične pljačke, napade, nesreće. I politiku. Politika je još gora. Gđa Mendez na stolić je stavila vreli tanjur pun riže i graška pa pokupila dvije prazne limenke piva s poda. „Sad je samo pitanje vremena kad će susjedi opet početi prosvjedovati i gunđati.”...

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The article analyzes the concept of intensity promoted in late capitalism, and its difference from the teleological intensity of the countercultural sixties. Intensity is approached through psychoanalytic lenses as related to Freud’s drive theory, and to Lacan’s concept of jouissance. Counter-depressive intensity persists today devoid of any meaning, as it is a self-legitimating strategy of the most perfect and best conformed capitalist subject. The notion of the culture of intensity covers the natural privileging of late capitalism towards ‘the good intense.’ This paper analyzes its reverse: ‘the bad intense,’ and the tragedy of dysphoria. The movie Shame (2011), directed by Steve McQueen, is interpreted as an example of the transformation of the countercultural value of sexuality in the sixties to its mere reduction to both intense and numbing experience. Keywords: intensity, Eros, death drive, jouissance, euphoria, countercultureThis paper analyzes the concept of intensity promoted in late capitalism as the only life worthy of living. Immoderation, extreme experiences, intensity gone astray and energy gone awry, living your life to the full, transgressing the borders which previously separated life and death, have been inherited from the countercultural sixties. Yet, the moment in which the mainstream culture adopted intensity, it itself lost all of its revolutionary and countercultural potential. Counter-depression, the denial of depression, and (hypo)mania seem to be operating in the mainstream discourse as late capitalism defences. What is the main difference between the still teleological intensity of the sixties and the intensity in the 21st century? How does the famous trio “sex, drugs, and rock’n’roll” fare in the first decades of this millennium?...

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