The Anatomy of Love

No. 2 - Year 7 - 06/2017

Editorial

In All About Love: New Visions, bell hooks observes that we are constantly exposed to messages telling us that the workings of love are mysterious and its agency unfathomable; that love is, in other words, only invaluable if it remains unexplained and unknowable. hooks argues that knowledge is a crucial element of love and that understanding its forces does not detract from its importance and value; on the contrary, it enriches the experience of love. More recently, Alain Badiou has in In Praise of Love similarly claimed that love is a ‘truth procedure,’ the kind of experience through which the truth about Two is constructed...

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Featuring

Alciphron's Letters (2nd or 3rd century AD) belong to Greek fictional epistolography, a subgenre whose literary conventions forbid direct portrayals of nudity or physical contacts. However, once the author chose erotica as a prevalent theme for his letters, he found himself entrapped; he had the obligation to obey the “chastity” of the literary subgenre and avoid any drifts into pornography and impropriety, but, at the same time, he was expected to satisfy his readers' curiosity and tantalize their imagination with shy innuendos. Consequently, he had to make sure that his stylistic devices used for erotic allusions (metaphors, metonymies, euphemisms etc.) were as vivid and various in origin as possible. Those erotic expressions are at the focus of this paper. In accordance with the given theme, the ones that contain the idea of violence, conflict, and warfare or its consequences are scrutinized. Once the erotic expressions of this kind are detected, they will be placed into a wider context. Their importance (both quantitative and qualitative) and their meanings achieved in the “domicile” letters will be determined. Furthermore, the examples will be compared with similar ones from Philostratus' and Aristaenetus' letter-collections. The final goal of the paper is to define the comprehensive role of “violent” erotic expressions in the literary subgenre as a whole. ...

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Francuski medievalist i jedan od najznačajnijih povjesničara Europe, sad već pokojni Jacques Le Goff, napisao je knjižicu pod naslovom Treba li povijest zaista dijeliti na razdoblja? Većina ljudi ne promišlja o ovom pitanju, a da nije samo riječ o problemu koji ostaje na margini svakodnevnog života svjedoče i podatci da mnogi povjesničari nisu svjesni ovog pitanja što je utjelovljeno u studijskim programima koji su podijeljeni kronološki po razdobljima i oformljeni po vremenskom slijedu, posebno u Hrvatskoj. Le Goff ide korak naprijed pokazujući zašto je promišljanje o vremenu jedno od temeljnih pitanja povijesne znanosti.Knjižica od 124 stranice sastavljena je od sljedećih osam ključnih poglavlja: Stare periodizacije, Kasna pojava srednjeg vijeka, Povijest, obrazovanje, periodi, Rođenje renesanse, Renesansa danas, Srednji vijek postaje mračno doba, Dugi srednji vijek, Periodizacija i globalizacija. Knjiga započinje Predgovorom i Uvodom, a nakon ovih osam poglavlja slijedi Izabrana bibliografija, Zahvale i O autoru....

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Love has traditionally been understood either as an objective, transcendentforce, or a subjective ability. Through a number of steps,the article argues that both these options have lost their credibility due to changes in the media through which love is performed. First, the article demonstrates how the attempts,in the life sciences, to explain love biologically or physically reproduce a traditional romantic ideology. Then, the implications of the inflation of explicit love declarations, and the consequences of internet dating, are discussed. What these examples amount to is the fact that the medium is brought to the fore. A consequence of this is that the romantic ideology is strengthened, while the premises of romantic love – the autonomous subject and the transcendent objectivity – are weakened or even dissolved.Keywords:idealism, materialism, narcissism, subjectivity, reification,internet dating, controlJennifer Lopez, Haddaway, Howard Jones – yes, virtually every singer, author,or philosopher since Sappho and Platohave raised the same question: What is love? This endless recurrence may be taken as a sign both of the aptness and inaptness of the question. The huge amount of answers makes it impossible to say anything that hasn’t already been said. Every love song is a cliché from the outset. On the other hand, the fact that the question keeps coming up over and over again, points to the endurance of the experience of or longing for love, and hence to the inevitability of the issue....

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In Nabokov’s Lolita, Humbert Humbert’s The Enchanted Hunters, as a quest for love, aims to reconstruct a felicitous world or integrate various fragmentary details into an organic unity that revives a lost love, experiencing it on the basis of irony, and revealing a simulation of the desire, violence, and despondency which have been expressed in myths of nymphs and Persephone. The protagonist never reaches this unity, but his narrative of erotic and romantic love reveals him as a pathetic addict engaged in mechanical reproduction related to the phenomena of desire, seduction, violence, and sex. His The Enchanted Hunters does not simulate what he expects of his childhood love with Annabel; rather, it simulates the erotic imagination suggested in Mary D. Sheriff’s term “nymphomania,” in which artists fall degenerately to a model of tragedy. Keywords: simulation, nymph, nymphomania, The Enchanted Hunters The Enchanted Hunters in Nabokov’s Lolita refers to the name of a hotel and the title of a play. This seeming coincidence is actually not coincidental: Nabokov weaves a story concerning a pedophile’s seduction of a prepubescent child into a “story within a story,” in which the girl is imagined as a seducer who bewitches a number of hunters. Just as the girl in the play is a figment of a poet’s imagination, so Lolita in the novel Lolita is an imaginary production of a middle-aged pedophile. Yet Lolita is not so much a novel revealing guilt and mental disorder, but a mélange of art and reality, or more specifically, it is about a coinage in which the author fabricates art and myth in real life. Parallel to the protagonist who simulates what he expects of his childhood love, Annabel, in the form of the nymphet, Lolita, Nabokov replicates the beauty of butterflies in the pursuit of beauty and immortality, and develops the world of art with a pathetic tone whereby we gradually perceive a simulation of the desire, violence, and despondency which have been expressed in the myths of nymphs and Persephone. As Mary D. Sheriff’s term “nymphomania” suggests, Nabokov’s artist falls degenerately to a model of tragedy in the pursuit of butterflies (i.e., love and beauty)....

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