Future Insights

Broj 2 - Godina 9 - 06/2019

Uvodnik

The articles presented in the 18th issue of [sic] discuss, in broad terms, the ways in which literary and cultural phenomena manage to transcend the temporal and spatial framework into which they were born. They thus provide understandings and intuitions with continuing relevance, and their impact extends – regardless of when they were created – well into the future. In the opening article, Dejan Durić and Željka Matijašević analyze the concept of intensity through psychoanalytic lenses, as it evolves from the 1960s counterculture toward the present-day forms of capitalism. Krešimir Vuković delves into the imagery of classical literature and explores what insights Homer, Hesiod, and Callimachus offered for future authors. Finally, Korana Serdarević turns toward teaching methodology and tackles the issue of whether 19th century literature can help shape the views of today’s (and tomorrow’s) society. ..

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Izdvojeno

The idea of the landlord's estate as “paradise on land,” traditional in the Russian culture of the late 19th and early 20th century, evolved in the literature of the 1910s and 1920s into the idea of the city-garden, which united the “beginning” and “ends” of the image of Biblical paradise – the Old Testament Eden and the Apocalyptic New Jerusalem. The substrate of the city-garden mythologem became the "estate topos," which indicates its plasticity and significant heuristic potential, i.e. not only its belonging to the former landowner estate of the 19th century, but also its ability to create new cultural modifications, such as the “city of the future” by V. V. Khlebnikov or the “city garden” in the prose of A. N. Tolstoy and in the Soviet poetry of the 1920s.Keywords: paradise, topics, landowner estate, estate topos, “city of the future,” “city-garden,” the first third of the 20th century, A. N. Tolstoy, V. V. Khlebnikov, V. V. Mayakovsky...

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In the center of our attention is the postapocalyptic situation in Andrei Platonov´s novel Chevengur, which is characterized by the absence of labor. This fact does not give evidence of the paradise for which the chiliasts strove but turns out to be one of the main reasons of its self-destruction. The author´s argumentation is built on the confrontation of the beginning and the end of the novel. In both cases, labor is represented in an unusually strange way. But in fact, there is a principal difference between these two representations of labor. In the first case, we are dealing with the rising line of the transition from peasant’s craft to proletarian labor, whereas the development of the “economy” of Chevengur is shown as a process of decline.Keywords: post/apocalyptic, chiliasm, laborU literaturi o romanu Čevengur (1926. – 1928.) nerijetko se spominju dva termina – apokalipsa i hilijazam (ili milenarizam). Apokalipsa je općenitiji termin koji označava eshatološku predodžbu kraja svijeta i čiji temeljni predložak pronalazimo u Otkrivenju apostola Ivana. Koncept hilijazma obuhvaća povijesne pokrete koji, oslanjajući se na predodžbe apokalipse, teže k tisućljetnom kraljevstvu na zemlji. Za razliku od hilijazma, apokalipsa se odvija bez čovjekovog upletanja. Kao što primjećuje Sergej Bulgakov, „eshatologija” je „potpuna suprotnost hilijazmu, ona nikada ne može postati povijesni cilj i ostaje izvan ljudskog dosega” (Bulgakov 221). Kod hilijazma najčešće je prisutan element društvenog protesta protiv nepravednosti, siromaštva, potlačivanja itd., koji se izražava u kvazireligijskim oblicima (Cohn). Hilijazam je ustanak protiv povijesti. Radi toga, boljševik Čepurnyj u Čevenguru „nije mogao podnijeti tajne vremena” (Platonov, Sobranie. Tom 3. 318). U hilijazmu se isprepleću povijesna i izvanpovijesna koncepcija vremena, budući da jedna pretpostavlja ljudsko djelovanje, a druga se oslanja na metapovijesno nadahnuće (Talmom 130)....

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In an age when social media dominate everyday lives of many people across the globe and with the rise of VR games, Netflix, fake news, and 3D printers, it is evident that (digital) technology has become an integral part of everyday life. Online games make new spaces of communication and cooperation that cross the seemingly established borders of nation-states, discussions about online and offline communities gain more prominence each year, and social networks have brought to the fore many scholarly works dealing with various questions about identity, culture, and identification. In this context, a comprehensive guide on or overview of how we could approach these issues in the academic context was scarce. Grant Bollmer’s book titled Theorizing Digital Cultures provides a way of approaching these, somewhat new issues, providing specific tools, i.e. terms and concepts that could help many future researchers of digital culture. What makes this work even more important is the fact that it is made and planned to be used primarily in the field of humanities and social sciences. ...

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From Homer’s Odyssey and Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe to Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, the sea has always featured prominently in Western literature. Stories of voyages over (or under) boundless oceans, tales of mutiny and piracy, of treasure and adventure, have all become an integral part of our literary tradition. And while it was frequently admired, the sea’s capricious nature and fathomless depths have often led to it being feared in equal measure. Compiled and edited by Mike Ashley, From the Depths and Other Strange Tales of the Sea is an anthology comprising fifteen lesser known stories taken from other collections and pulp magazines dating back to the early 20th century, which ably illustrates that period’s fascination with the sea, especially with its more fantastical and uncanny aspects.The collection opens strongly with an invitingly horrific, if somewhat traditional ghost ship story. Albert A. Wetjen’s “The Ship of Silence” draws heavily both from legends like the Flying Dutchman and real-world mysteries like the Mary Celeste. An abandoned ship’s fate is revealed through the frenzied screeching of a parrot, the ship’s sole survivor, as it repeats the words of the doomed crew in their final moments. Bearing more than a passing resemblance to many of H. P. Lovecraft’s stories, the horror here lies not so much in what is shown, but in what is left to the reader’s imagination. Morgan Robertson’s “From the Darkness and the Depths” continues in the same vein and also features a ship assailed by invisible terrors. It is one of a number of stories from the period which emphasize, and often overestimate, the power of science and its ability to combat forces unfathomable to the human mind....

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